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3 simple questions to ask to close a deal

3 simple questions to ask to close a deal

In today’s issue, I’ll share 3 simple questions to ask if you want to close a deal. These questions are part of ProActive Selling, a sales methodology developed by Skip Miller.

If you’re struggling to qualify your opportunities, these will help you test the energy of your deals, disqualify tire-kickers, and understand where to invest your time.

But first, here’s a short story:

Question 1: What’s causing you to have a conversation with me?

This is one of the first questions you need to ask as you’re starting your first conversation with a prospect. Instead of asking them why they are here, ask them “What’s causing you to have a conversation with me?”

This will help prospects open up and share the real reasons they are in the meeting with you. Some may just be curious (don’t waste your time with them), some may have a specific initiative they are working on (dig deeper).

Question 2: What outcomes do you expect from this conversation?

Second question will help you understand your prospect’s initiatives. By focusing on asking what outcomes they expect, you get them to share the agenda and goals they have for the conversation.

This will help you dig deeper, and disqualify prospects who may not have a compelling event. For example, if they answer that they are just checking or making a benchmark, you’ll know you can disqualify them and end the conversation as soon as possible.

Question 3: When can you make a decision?

Final question, and my favorite of all three. By asking prospects when they can make a decision, you do two things:

  • you test the energy of your deal
  • you understand their buying process

Most prospects won’t be able to give you a straight answer. This indicates they’ll have to involve other people in the buying process, and you can ask them additional questions about the steps required to close the deal.

And these are 3 simple questions you can ask to test the energy of your deals, and close the ones that are qualified faster.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

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Tactical Selling

5 sales tools I can’t live without

5 sales tools I can’t live without

In today’s issue, I’ll share 5 sales tools I can’t live without. I’ve tried hundreds of tools in my sales career, and most of them weren’t really helpful.

Sales tools are often great to automate repetitive parts of our job, but they often include a ton of useless features (all the AI email writers, icebreakers, etc.) and they end up wasting everyone’s time.

There are over 5.529 sales tools, in 25 sub-categories, and here are 5 I can’t live without.

AmpleMarket

AmpleMarket is the ultimate, all-in-one sales engagement platform. I use it everyday to grab LinkedIn profiles, put prospects into sequences, and make sure that I’m actually reaching out to them on a structured and direct way.

You can use my link if you want to give it a try (and get a 10% discount if you decide to go for it).

Kaspr.io

Kaspr is an amazing Chrome extension you can install to discover phone numbers and emails from prospects. It’s really useful if you’re not using an all-in-one platform, and if you’re looking for hard to find prospect data, especially in EMEA.

LinkedIn Native Videos

LinkedIn Native Videos are videos recorded within the LinkedIn app. They are incredibly powerful to stand out, as most salespeople don’t even know they exist (you can only record them with the app). I wrote a detailed guide to help you use them in 2024.

Prospecting Template Swipe File

The Prospecting Template Swipe File is a collection of killer prospecting message templates from top sales creators and influencers. I have collected over 25 cold emails, LinkedIn, and cold call templates you can use to start more conversations with prospects. It’s regularly updated.

It even includes prompts to help you make these templates yours.

Sales Process Calculator

Finally, my Sales Process Calculator is a resource I use every day to understand how many prospects I need to add to my sequence in order to reach my targets. It’s a simple formula to turn my revenue targets into daily activity.

And these are 5 tools I can’t live without. This shortlist is the result of years of trial and error, and they help me to:

  • build lead lists
  • find prospect data
  • put them into sequences
  • reach out in a structured way

Hope this list was helpful. If you know of another tool I should try, just reply to this email.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

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Tactical Selling

My 2024 guide to video prospecting

My 2024 guide to video prospecting

In today’s issue, I’ll share my 2024 guide to video prospecting. Video prospecting has been around for quite some time, and it was really hot during COVID.

In 2024, many salespeople seem to have forgotten how to use video to prospect, which is a great opportunity to use this media to catch the attention of your prospects, and start more conversations.

Here’s how, step-by-step:

Step 1: Use LinkedIn native video

The first step is to use LinkedIn native videos. Native videos are videos that are recorded using the LinkedIn mobile app. Here’s a quick video where I show you how it’s done:

There’s a good reason to use that feature over a video prospecting tool. As it’s only available on the mobile LinkedIn app, most salespeople won’t use it because they prospect with LinkedIn on their computer. You will mathematically stand out by using native videos, just like LinkedIn voice notes.

Step 2: Write a simple script

Next, write a simple script. You really need to avoid blabbering for five minutes because no one’s going to actually watch this video. It needs to be direct, concrete, and last 30 seconds or less. You can use this simple template:

  • Trigger: Your excuse for reaching out
  • Problem: A problem faced by many of your customers
  • Teaser: A teaser of a resource to solve that problem
  • CTA: A simple ask

Example:

  • Trigger: “Ara, saw you also liked Josh’s post about SDRs being too inconsistent.”
  • Problem: “I speak with a lot of VPs of Sales who are struggling to keep their SDRs prospecting consistently.”
  • Teaser: “If you’re interested, I have a quick checklist to help your team start their day with a prospecting block, and get closer to prospecting every single day.”
  • CTA: “Should I send it over?”

Step 3: Record your video

You have your script ready, now make sure to practice before recording your video, because you’ll be stressed. After a few tries, you’ll get better, I promise. Here’s an example with the script from above:

Step 4: Repeat

Now that you have sent your first prospecting video, you need to keep sending more. If you send one and stop, you may get lucky and get a reply, but there’s more chances this one prospect will ignore you.

You have to integrate video prospecting into your daily prospecting routine and do it every day for a few weeks to really measure the results this can bring. If you stick to your script, keep your videos short, and send a few every day, you’ll start seeing replies, you’ll get more conversations going, and you’ll book more meetings.

So remember:

  1. Use LinkedIn native videos
  2. Write a simple script
  3. Record your video
  4. Repeat

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

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Tactical Selling

A simple prospecting shift to book more meetings

A simple prospecting shift to book more meetings

In today’s newsletter, I will walk you through an important mindset shift for salespeople:

Moving from booking meetings with total strangers only (net new logos), to booking meetings with people you already know.

This shift will drastically improve your prospecting results, as you’ll start a lot more conversations, and book more meetings as a result.

It’s important because it will change your focus from something that requires advanced prospecting skills – convincing a total stranger to meet with you, to something you naturally do every day – starting conversations.

Let’s dive in:

The biggest mistake

Most salespeople who are prospecting have one goal: turning strangers into customers. This approach is understandable, because that’s what they are measured on.

However, when you are focusing on booking meetings with total strangers only, you make your job a lot harder than it has to be. Without reaching out to people they already know (active customers, previous customers, partners, and so on), salespeople end up having less conversations, and losing motivation.

Before you know it, you’re sending hundreds of emails each week, without getting any reply, and you start worrying about reaching your targets. You change your messaging too often, and your inner voice starts doubting your capacity to book a meeting.

A better approach: focus on people you know

Here’s how I recommend building pipeline with people you already know:

  1. Create prospect tiers: What type of people can you reach out to? Existing customers, past customers, lost opportunities, partners, etc. ?
  2. Get accurate data: Is the contact info still relevant? What kind of trigger can you use?
  3. Build a sequence skeleton for each tier: What concrete steps will you follow to get them to answer?
  4. Write your messages: What are you going to write in your touchpoints?
  5. Set time blocks and execute: How can you protect your time to get in touch with these people on a daily basis?

Example: Booking meetings with past customers

For example, let’s say you have a good amount of past customers, but no active engagement with them.

Start by following the 5 steps from above:

Create prospect tiers: From all these past customers, you may have some who churned, some who worked with you for a few months, or standalone projects. List every prospect type and assign them to a different tier.

Get accurate data: Now that you have your list, you need to make sure your information is up-to-date. Is their email or phone number still accurate (check Kaspr if you need good quality data)? Did they change jobs? Did they get promoted? Find all the information you can to make your outreach message relevant.

Build a sequence skeleton for each tier: With people you already know, your chances of getting replies are way higher than with total strangers. But you can’t expect everyone to immediately reply and jump on a meeting with you. Using 3 touchpoints over email and LinkedIn is preferable because it helps you preserve your relationship, without being too pushy.

Here’s a sequence structure you can use:

Sequence


Write your messages: You have your sequence skeleton, now you need to write something relevant to get your prospects interested (check these additional templates). Remember, your messages should have the following elements:

  • be short (under 125 words)
  • give a valid reason for reaching out
  • tease curiosity

You can use the 3 following frameworks to do so:

First message:

  • Trigger: A mention of your relationship
  • Reason: The reason why you’re contacting them
  • Teaser: A short sentence to tease the curiosity of your prospect

Second message:

  • Trigger: A mention of your previous message
  • Question: A question related to a problem they had
  • Teaser: An intriguing piece of information
  • CTA: A simple ask

Third message:

Bump: A one or two words question

Here is an example:

Messages

Set time blocks and execute: You may be tempted to launch your sequence and contact as many prospects as possible, but it’s not the best idea. If you reach out to too many prospects at once, you’ll quickly lose motivation. You will end up with too many follow-ups at once, which will most likely discourage you.

Instead, create daily time blocks to protect your time, and add a set number of prospects to your sequence every day. I personally contact 2 expansion prospects per day, as part of my 5 daily new prospects to contact. This creates a steady input of prospects, which turns into a predictable output (replies and meetings).

Tying it back to you

If your job involves booking meetings with prospects (it should be if you’re in sales), start by creating tiers of people you already know, and get accurate data about them.

Once you’ve done that, build a sequence skeleton, write your messages, and include these prospects in your daily prospecting routine.

This approach will help you start many more conversations, and help you land more meetings, without having to focus on total strangers only.

And if you want a step-by-step guide on doing this, and much more, then go check my flagship course, The Prospecting Engine.

Hope to see you in there.

Cheers,

Thibaut

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

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Tactical Selling

What I learned from the last sales job I ever had

What I learned from the last sales job I ever had

In today’s issue, I’ll share 3 key lessons I learned from the last sales job I ever had. If you can take these lessons and apply them to what you sell, you’ll be in a better position to start more conversations, book more meetings, and close bigger deals.

But first, a bit of context. The last sales job I ever had was an Account Executive position for a tech company based in the US. They had been successful in raising money and deploying their solution in many mobile apps on the US market. I stayed for a total of 5 months, before quitting and going on my own.

Here’s what I learned:

Lesson 1: If you don’t understand the product, your prospects won’t get it either

When you work for a startup, you may not have a product-market fit yet. The early funding is supposed to help the company find it, and help you sell you first deals. It’s especially true if you’re opening a new market (like I was supposed to do).

In many cases, the founders are convinced that their product is revolutionary, but they can’t quite explain you why. That was the case for me. I remember going to California for a 2-week onboarding bootcamp. I attended many product sessions, deal reviews, and so on, but I couldn’t grasp why people would buy what we were selling.

When I came back to Europe, I started prospecting and meeting prospects, but I was not capable to explain them what outcomes they would get from using the product I was selling. The pitch deck was focused on the features (woofing, as Skip Miller would say), but my prospects couldn’t care less.

Takeways:

  • Nobody cares about your product
  • Raising lots of money ≠ guaranteed success
  • What works in the US may not work in EMEA

Lesson 2: A founder is often a terrible salesperson

This last job gave me the opportunity to understand that selling isn’t a natural quality of many founders. They may be great at raising money, telling a compelling story to investors, or telling white lies, but they are often too focused on themselves to be good salespeople.

At my last sales job, I had the opportunity to go meet prospects in Paris, with one of the co-founders of the company. He destroyed every single opportunity I had been working on by reciting his fundraising deck. He was bragging about the “award-winning” technology we used, the size of our team, the crazy growth of the company, and so on.

There was just one problem. All these prospects were French, they didn’t really understand English, and they didn’t have any space to share what they were working on.

Takeaways:

  • Founders are often great at many things, but not selling
  • Their obsession with scale will hurt your deals
  • French people do not speak good English 😂

Lesson 3: It’s never about what you sell

This last lesson is the most important I learned from my last sales job. I had the opportunity to meet with Skip Miller during a 2-day training organized by the company, and it changed the trajectory of my career. I learned that everything your prospects are interested in is themselves.

They are only interested in understanding if your product can help them reach their targets, what outcomes it’s going to create for them, and how you can help them make a dent in their problems.

Takeaways:

  • If you don’t know your prospects problems, you don’t have deal
  • Nobody cares about what you sell, they care about outcomes
  • If you had the chance to meet Skip Miller, you were blessed

And these are the 3 most important lessons I learned from the last sales job I ever had. I’ve been working on my own since September 2018, and I like to say I’m totally unemployable as a result. Leaving this last job seemed risky at the time, but it was the best decision of my life, as I found out I was able to make money on my own terms, without having to report to anyone.

Hope this inspires you to be more intentional with what you want to do with your life.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Get my free, 4 min weekly newsletter. Used by 5.900+ salespeople to book more meetings.

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Tactical Selling

3 intent triggers I can’t live without

3 intent triggers I can’t live without

In today’s issue, I’ll share 3 triggers I use every day to start conversations with prospects, based on their online activity. If you can identify and use these triggers in your outreach, you’ll start a lot more conversations, and you’ll book more meetings as a result.

Let’s dive in:

Trigger 1: LinkedIn post like/comments

This is the ultimate low-hanging fruit.

Your first step is to understand what kind of problems your prospects are trying to solve, and to identify influencers/thought leaders who speak about these problems on a regular basis.

When you have identified these influencers, you can follow them, and create a routine of checking their posts regularly, so you can select the ones that are useful to your prospects. Here’s an example.

When you find someone who fits with your ICP, you can export them with Amplemarket (or manually), and use the post as an excuse for reaching out.

Example:

“Mary, saw you also liked Kyle’s post about the new SDR/AE hybrid role.

Opposed to seeing how I helped 10 SDRs at Amplemarket do just that?”

Trigger 2: Champion left company

This trigger is my favorite because I can use it to contact two prospects, and potentially create two separate opportunities. It works when you’re working on a deal, and your champion leaves the company.

You can contact them to ask about their new gig with the following message:

“Josh, saw you recently left the company, how’s the new gig? Would it be a bad idea to hop on a quick call so you can tell me more about your goals?”

You can also contact the ATL (Above The Line) of the old opportunity and ask them about the project:

“Mary, heard that Josh is on his way out. Should we chat about the SDR training project he was working on, or is it leaving with Josh too?”

Trigger 3: New job

This trigger works well with people you already know. It can be from previous collaborations, lost opportunities, or active opportunities. I recommend avoiding lengthy emails, and simply asking them about the new job.

That’s how I start most of my conversations with people I didn’t speak to for a while:

“Harsh, how’s the new gig?”

I found that most people will reply, and they’ll immediately jump in to a business conversation if the timing is good (just like Aaron did below):

Image #1

And these are 3 intent triggers I can’t live without. If you can identify these triggers and use them when reaching out to your prospects, you’ll get a lot more replies, and you’ll book a lot more meetings.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Get my free, 4 min weekly newsletter. Used by 5.900+ salespeople to book more meetings.

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Tactical Selling

Your recipe for a perfect Reciprocity Resource

Your recipe for a perfect Reciprocity Resource

In today’s issue, I’ll share the exact system I follow to create a Reciprocity Resource. If you follow these steps, you’ll tease the curiosity of your prospects, and you’ll start more conversations. More conversations = more meetings.

The biggest challenge salespeople face with prospecting is the lack of replies. They send tons of emails, LinkedIn messages, or calls, but all they hear is crickets. That’s because they focus on booking a meeting, instead of starting a conversation.

Humans are curious by nature. If you use this natural trait in your prospecting, you’ll start a lot more conversations.

Let’s dive in.

Step 1: Find a publicly available marketing resource

If you’ve been reading me for a while, you know I always insist on finding your prospects’ problems in details, before starting your prospecting sequence. When this is done, you can start looking for a publicly available marketing resource to solve a part of this problem.

For example, a lot of VP of Sales spend way too much time navigating complex sales dashboards, which prevents them from making simple decisions, because of the information overload.

This article would be a good resource to help them focus on a simple set of metrics, and solve a part of their analysis paralysis.

Now, go to the resource center on the website of your company, and find a few articles, blog posts, or webinars that could help your prospects solve a concrete issue they have. If you can’t find it on your website, go check your direct competitors’ for inspiration.

Step 2: Convert the resource into a checklist

Most marketing resources on your website are useful for prospects who are further down the marketing funnel. They help them validate their problems, but they can’t be used in this format to tease prospects’ curiosity.

That’s why sharing case studies, white papers, and eBooks makes no sense when prospecting.

Instead, pick a resource, and convert it into a checklist. For example, the article I mentioned earlier could be converted in a checklist with the 5 metrics, how to calculate them, and a benchmark for each metric.

If you need a more detailed guide to creating a reciprocity resource, you can check this one I wrote a few months ago.

Step 3: Tease the resource

Now that you have a checklist ready to use, you need to get it in the hands of your prospects. You could be tempted to send it right away in your prospecting message, but this would prevent you from starting a lot of conversations. If you share it right away, prospects won’t need to reply to get access to it. Instead, use a template like this one:

“FirstName, curious to know how you’re avoiding spending too much time staring at an overly complex sales dashboard.

If you’re interested, I can share a short checklist on 5 prospecting metrics you can’t afford to ignore.

Sounds interesting?”

And these are the 3 steps you can follow to create a perfect Reciprocity Resource. With this resource, you’ll get a lot more interest from your prospects (if you know their problems well), and your reply rate will shoot up.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Get my free, 4 min weekly newsletter. Used by 5.900+ salespeople to book more meetings.

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Tactical Selling

How to optimize your LinkedIn profile for prospecting

How to optimize your LinkedIn profile for prospecting

In today’s issue, I’ll share a 3-step system you can follow to optimize your LinkedIn profile if you work in sales. Most salespeople I see on LinkedIn have optimized their LinkedIn profiles to find a new job, not to help prospects start conversations with them.

If your LinkedIn profile is filed with details about your sales achievements, how many times you went to President’s Club, and how you managed to extract money from difficult clients, then you’ll have a hard time booking meetings on LinkedIn.

Here’s how to optimize your LinkedIn profile, step-by-step:

Step 1: Update your banner

See the banner below:

Image #1

Every LinkedIn user has a space where they can display a customized banner. The one above doesn’t provide any valuable information. I like to think of your LinkedIn banner as a highway billboard. It’s free real estate on your profile, and it can be used to attract your prospect’s attention.

When prospects go to their “My Network” section, this is what they see:

Image #2

If your banner isn’t optimized to attract your prospect’s attention, then you’re missing out. Here’s what to do instead:

  • Respect the banner format: 1584 x 396 pixels
  • Use catchy, homogenous colours
  • Use large text and CTAs

Go check my LinkedIn banner to see a concrete example.

Step 2: Write a clear headline

Your LinkedIn headline has one goal: get prospects to understand you aren’t a threat to them (so they can accept a connection request). Your headline will be displayed everywhere your profile appears on LinkedIn. For example, prospects will see it in your connection requests (as seen below).

Image #3

Below is a simple structures you can use to optimize your headline.

  1. What you do: I train and coach
  2. Who you help: SDRs and AEs
  3. What’s the outcome of working with you: to book more meetings and close bigger deals faster.

“I train and coach SDRs and AEs to book more meetings and close bigger deals faster.”

Step 3: Optimize your featured section

Now that your banner and headline are optimized, you need to provide additional resources to help your prospects solve a problem they want to solve. You can do that by adding links in your featured section.

I often see salespeople highlighting a viral post in this section. It’s completely useless.

Instead, think of a simple resource to help your prospects. Here’s a list of resources that can be useful for your prospects:

  • A checklist
  • A one-pager
  • A link to a webinar
  • A link to book a meeting with you

If you can gate these resources (ask for an email in exchange of the resource), you’ll be able to follow up with your prospects. I recommend checking Distribute if you want to create a lead magnet and create your own content engine (even as an SDR or AE).

Pro tip: When you add a link in the featured section, leave the description empty. This will directly open the link in a new tab, instead of displaying an intermediary validation page (always done when linking outside of LinkedIn).

And this is how you can optimize your LinkedIn profile for sales. When you stop using it as an online resume, and start using it to help your prospects solve a problem, you’ll start more conversations, and book more meetings as a result.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Get my free, 4 min weekly newsletter. Used by 5.900+ salespeople to book more meetings.

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Tactical Selling

Use this hidden feature to book meetings on LinkedIn

Use this hidden feature to book meetings on LinkedIn

In today’s issue, I’ll share a hidden LinkedIn feature you can use to book more meetings. I recently polled my LinkedIn audience, and 39% of the poll participants shared they weren’t getting replies because prospects didn’t pay attention to their outreach:

Image #1

It’s a common challenge I see with salespeople doing outbound. They can’t find a way to get prospects to open their emails, or reply to their calls. As a result, they keep missing their targets.

The reason prospects ignore your outreach

The main reason your prospects ignore your outreach has to do with the amount of emails, LinkedIn messages, and cold calls they receive. A study from Jeremy Donovan shows that you need to touch an account five times more to source a cold outbound opportunity, compared to five years ago.

As a result, your prospect’s mailbox looks like this:

Image #2

The human brain is designed to use cognitive shortcuts to help reduce the energy required to make decisions. When humans see a mailbox like the one above, they quickly scan the screen, and they ignore anything that doesn’t stand out (or interrupts a pattern).

How to get prospects to pay attention

Meet LinkedIn voice notes.

These voice notes may not be immediately apparent. They can’t be sent when using LinkedIn on a computer; you need to use the LinkedIn app on your mobile device. The app is available for both iOS and Android, provided the operating system isn’t too old.

Remember, you can only send voice notes to people with whom you have a 1st degree connection. Navigate to the messaging section, find the person you want to contact, and look for a small microphone icon, as shown below:

Image #3

Hold your finger on the microphone icon and you’ll be able to record a voice note (max 60 seconds). When you’re done, a confirmation popup will appear, it will be sent to the recipient, and the voice note will look like that:

Image #4

Imagine receiving this. Your first instinct will be to hit the play button, as you’ll be curious to know what’s behind this blue bar.

If you’re receiving hundreds of daily emails, this will clearly stand out, and you’ll pay attention.

What to say in the voice note?

Now that you have the attention of your prospect, you need to be relevant and direct. I have over 25 templates you can use, but here’s my favorite for a LinkedIn voice note:

Template

Trigger: {First Name} mentioned that your worked together on {Common Work}.

Opposed: Would you be opposed to {desired outcome}?

Example

Joe, Morgan mentioned that you were hiring over 20 reps in Q2.

Would you be opposed to learning how you can prevent 30% of these 20 hires from leaving within 90 days? 

And this is how you can use LinkedIn voice notes to book more meetings. Remember, you need to be a 1st degree connection to be able to send these voice notes, so check this detailed guide to getting 60% to 70% of your connection requests accepted.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Get my free, 4 min weekly newsletter. Used by 5.900+ salespeople to book more meetings.

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Why InMails suck (and what to use instead)

Why InMails suck (and what to use instead)

In today’s newsletter, I’m going to share why LinkedIn InMails are terrible for prospecting, and what you can use instead. Prospecting on LinkedIn is the easiest way to book meetings (if your prospects are active on it), but you have to know which tool to use, and how to be creative to stand out.

Let’s dive in:

Why InMails suck

When you google InMails, the first sponsored result looks like this:

Image #1

How many times do you see the word “Ads”? I checked, and it’s written 12 times. What it means is that LinkedIn InMails are designed for marketers (to run campaigns at scale), but not for salespeople.

For example, they are used for lead generation, to send messages at scale (like the one below):

Image #2

As you can see, a few elements are problematic with this InMail as a prospecting message:

  1. An InMail lands in a parallel inbox, it is flagged as an InMail, and a small label appears to signal this
  2. The person is a 2nd degree connection, which normally prevents them from reaching out
  3. There’s two call-to-action at the bottom of the InMail (which I never get in normal messages)

Now, how do you think prospects react when they see your InMails? Most ignore them, because they see it as ads, not as prospecting messages sent specifically for them.

What to do instead

Step 1: Optimize your LinkedIn profile for sales

The first thing you need to do is to stop using InMails as a prospecting tool. Instead, focus on optimizing your LinkedIn profile. You have a few 3 mains goals when optimizing your LinkedIn profile for sales:

  1. Catch the attention of your prospects with a banner
  2. Get them to read your headline
  3. Build trust

I wrote a full guide on doing just that. It’s a bit old, so hit me up on LinkedIn (or reply to this message) if you want to see a V2.

Step 2: Find a relevant trigger for each prospect

With a LinkedIn profile optimized for sales, you then need to find a relevant trigger to get in touch with your prospects. A trigger is a publicly available piece of information that indicates a prospect may have a problem you can help with, or an interest in speaking with you. A trigger can take many shapes, for example:

  • A reaction/comment to a LinkedIn post
  • A visit on your LinkedIn profile
  • A post from a prospect

There are countless triggers you can use to start conversations with prospects. You just need to know their problems in details, and find out where these people hang out.

Step 3: Write direct, useful connection requests (or write nothing)

In most cases, you won’t be connected with your prospects on LinkedIn. This means you only have two options to contact them on LinkedIn:

  • Send them an InMail (you know how I feel about that)
  • Send them a connection request

There’s an art to sending connection requests. Your goal is to create a short, direct, and useful message to your prospect. You want to catch their attention, and get them to become a first degree connection by accepting the request.

In some cases, you won’t have anything relevant to mention in your connection request. If that’s the case, let your optimized LinkedIn profile do the job and send it without a text. If you need some inspiration, I have a list of connection requests (and cold messages) you can’t afford to miss.

And this why InMails suck for prospecting, and what you can do instead. If you need help to build a prospecting system on LinkedIn, I recommend purchasing my Prospecting Engine. It’s the ultimate knowledge and systems to start conversations, book meetings, and generate a healthy pipeline in 2024 and beyond.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Thibaut Souyris

P.S. When you’re ready, here are 3 ways I can help you:

→ Enroll in The Prospecting Engine

Need to train your team or invite me as a speaker? Book a call here

→ Sponsor my content & get 45K+ eyeballs on your ad

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